trangnguyen28:

The most remote tribes in the world: Kazajo, Mongolia.


I was once asked if I was Mongolian (lol?) and to be honest, I was quite honored! What amazing and resilient people, such beautiful and rich history. I could only be so lucky to have been decedent of Genghis Khan!
shared October 19, 2014 - 3 notes / via - source
historical-nonfiction:

In 1944, as the Allies were preparing to invade France, British Intelligence sought a way to confuse the Germans as to their plans. They had many different schemes going on at once, but one was particularly interesting. They hired Meyrick Clifton James (right), an Australian-born lieutenant in the Army Pay Corps who bore a striking resemblance to Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery. The Field Marshal would be commanding the Allied ground troops during the invasion. James was invited to London, and while pretending to be a journalist, he set about studying the general’s speech patterns and mannerisms. Then he was conspicuously sent off, as “Monty”, to Gibraltar and then to Algiers, watched by avid German spies.
It seemed to work. The plot went through “from start to finish without a hitch,” MI5 reported, “and we knew that the main feature of its story had reached the Germans.” The real Monty led the successful landings at Normandy while James recovered from the ordeal in a safe house in Cairo. “He was under terrible pressure and strain,” reported the wife of an intelligence officer detailed to look after him. “Coming out of that part was very difficult for him.” But he had something to cheer him up while he recuperated: Under army rules, he would receive the equivalent of a general’s pay for every day he had impersonated Monty.

historical-nonfiction:

In 1944, as the Allies were preparing to invade France, British Intelligence sought a way to confuse the Germans as to their plans. They had many different schemes going on at once, but one was particularly interesting. They hired Meyrick Clifton James (right), an Australian-born lieutenant in the Army Pay Corps who bore a striking resemblance to Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery. The Field Marshal would be commanding the Allied ground troops during the invasion. James was invited to London, and while pretending to be a journalist, he set about studying the general’s speech patterns and mannerisms. Then he was conspicuously sent off, as “Monty”, to Gibraltar and then to Algiers, watched by avid German spies.

It seemed to work. The plot went through “from start to finish without a hitch,” MI5 reported, “and we knew that the main feature of its story had reached the Germans.” The real Monty led the successful landings at Normandy while James recovered from the ordeal in a safe house in Cairo. “He was under terrible pressure and strain,” reported the wife of an intelligence officer detailed to look after him. “Coming out of that part was very difficult for him.” But he had something to cheer him up while he recuperated: Under army rules, he would receive the equivalent of a general’s pay for every day he had impersonated Monty.

shared October 16, 2014 - 472 notes / via - source
I'm babbling again. Let's go.
shared October 14, 2014 - 822 notes / via - source
What doesn’t kill you gives you EXP.
shared October 14, 2014 - 52,114 notes / via - source

Seascape (detail), Gustave Coubert.

Seascape (detail), Gustave Coubert.

shared October 14, 2014 - 448 notes / via - source

d-june-y:

Ok i want to think about ay where Jean is in unpopular rock band and Marco is a student at the prestigious University of Economics and Business.

) It doesn’t make sense xdd

shared October 13, 2014 - 3,782 notes / via - source